Socially-Responsible Research Earns Production and Operations Management Field’s Highest Honor

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Burak Kazaz, The Steven R. Becker Professor of Supply Chain Management, The Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor of Teaching Excellence and executive director of the H.H. Franklin Center for Supply Chain Management (right) poses with one of his co-authors, Scott Webster, the Bob Herberger Arizona Heritage Chair in Supply Chain Management at Arizona State University, shortly after receiving the Production and Operations Management Society’s 2017 Wickham Skinner Prize for their research on malaria-medicine supply chains.

The Production and Operations Management Society awarded the 2017 Wickham Skinner Prize, its highest research honor, to Burak Kazaz, The Steven R. Becker Professor of Supply Chain Management, The Laura J. and L. Douglas Meredith Professor of Teaching Excellence and executive director of the H.H. Franklin Center for Supply Chain Management, at its annual conference in Seattle, Washington May 7. The award was based on Professor Kazaz’ publication examining the various interventions in malaria-medicine supply chains. Co-authors are Scott Webster, the Bob Herberger Arizona Heritage Chair in Supply Chain Management at Arizona State University, and Prashant Yadav, director of healthcare research at the William Davidson Institute of the University of Michigan.

According to the POMS, “the Wickham Skinner Awards are intended to encourage POM scholarship and publication, to promote significant research in the field, to reward academics who have achieved unusually high accomplishment early in their careers, and to facilitate the sharing of innovative new ideas about teaching POM.”

Professor Kazaz’ research has great implications for global health and outlines ways in which the malaria medicine supply chain can be stabilized to optimize production of the medicine to help save more lives. He and his co-authors demonstrate that the best way to ensure enough medicine is available is to improve agricultural yield of the plant used to make malaria medicine, Artemisia Annua.

“This work responds to the needs of multilateral agencies and philanthropic organizations that are considering and pursuing interventions that affect the availability and price of ACTs and its main ingredient artemisinin,” said Kazaz. “These organizations, such as the World Health OrganizationUNITAID and the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, would like to know where to invest their time and effort in order to create the highest positive impact in treating malaria.”

Kerri Howell

Kerri is director of communications and media relations for the Whitman School. She is responsible for managing all internal and external communications with students, faculty, staff, alumni, members of the business community and other key stakeholders.After receiving her B.A. from State University of New York at Geneseo, she went on to earn her M.S. in communications management from Syracuse’s S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications, where she has served as an adjunct professor in the public relations department since 2004.
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